“The federal pandemic influenza plan and public health experts predict that should the H5N1 influenza virus mutate in such a way that human-to-human transmission can easily occur, approximately 30 percent of the U.S. population could develop the disease. An influenza pandemic of some type could occur in the next few years … It is expected…

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As the COVID-19 strain of the coronavirus flows through our nation’s population, many Americans may find themselves working shorter shifts, working from home, on paid or unpaid medical leave, furloughed or even laid off. While additional remedies from federal, state and local governments may be forthcoming to help households sustain financial stability, there are programs…

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There are several factors contributing to the current housing shortage in the U.S. For starters, low inventory of existing homes for sale has driven up the prices of available housing, leaving many first- and second-time homebuyers unable to afford to buy or trade up. Housing permits for new construction have risen throughout the past couple…

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The United States is a very large, land-mass country. Yet, it offers few options in terms of coast-to-coast mass public transit, particularly compared to other developed countries. Europe’s countries tend to be smaller and their cities more dense, making them more transit-friendly. Asian countries made enormous government investments in urban rail networks just as their…

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We are all unique individuals with distinct personalities, likes and dislikes as well as different ways of talking, thinking, solving problems and interacting. We have exclusive modes of expressing ourselves through dress, grooming and our own catchphrases. And, we each have our own way of thinking about money. Some of us are frugal, some are…

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There’s an adage often found on decorative signs and other accessories that reads, “Be nice to your kids; they will choose your nursing home.” The saying rather drives home the best and the worst aspects about planning for old age. Many retirees will tell you that their most fervent wish is to have a good…

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The federal minimum wage is set at $7.25 an hour, a rate that has not increased in more than 10 years, not even to keep pace with the cost of living. Even so, the national average minimum wage is $11.80, but only because some states have increased their minimum floor.1 In 2020, another 24 states…

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The Supreme Court recently said it wouldn’t fast-track a hearing to discuss the end of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”), which means it’s unlikely a ruling will come before the 2020 election.1 Instead, Congress is engaged in a slow-moving discussion of health care issues with varying degrees of potential impact. In…

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That first summer after they graduate from college. When they get laid off. After a divorce. There are plenty of times in life when adult children, albeit reluctantly, move back in with their parents until they can get on stronger financial footing. Unfortunately, this has a way of happening right about the time when parents…

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In 1989, Harvard economists published a study concluding that as baby boomers aged out of the residential real estate market, there would be a glut of empty homes and prices would plummet.1 That clearly hasn’t happened yet, for a variety of reasons. Economists didn’t account for boomers’ life expectancy extending so much longer. People are…

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